Page 2 of 29 FirstFirst 123456789101112 ... LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 427
  1. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Posts
    1,536
    Post Thanks / Like

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    7,016
    Post Thanks / Like
    IBM's 'atomic memory' makes storage 100 times denser


  3. #18
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    7,016
    Post Thanks / Like
    QNX inside Prosche


  4. #19
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    7,016
    Post Thanks / Like

    Apple to announce tools, platform to "digitally destroy" textbook publishing

    Apple is slated to announce the fruits of its labor on improving the use of technology in education at its special media event on Thursday, January 19. While speculation has so far centered on digital textbooks, sources close to the matter have confirmed to Ars that Apple will announce tools to help create interactive e-books—the "GarageBand for e-books," so to speak—and expand its current platform to distribute them to iPhone and iPad users.
    Along with the details we were able to gather from our sources, we also spoke to two experts in the field of digital publishing to get a clearer picture of the significance of what Apple is planning to announce.
    So far, Apple has largely embraced the ePub 2 standard for its iBooks platform, though it has added a number of HTML5-based extensions to enable the inclusion of video and audio for some limited interaction. The recently-updated ePub 3 standard obviates the need for these proprietary extensions, which in some cases make iBook-formatted e-books incompatible with other e-reader platforms. Apple is expected to announce support for the ePub 3 standard for iBooks going forward.
    GarageBand for e-books

    At the same time, however, authoring standards-compliant e-books (despite some promises to the contrary) is not as simple as running a Word document of a manuscript through a filter. The current state of software tools continues to frustrate authors and publishers alike, with several authors telling Ars that they wish Apple or some other vendor would make a simple app that makes the process as easy as creating a song in GarageBand.
    Our sources say Apple will announce such a tool on Thursday.
    And Inkling CEO Matt MacInnis agrees that such a move would be very likely. MacInnis previously worked on education projects at Apple before leaving the company in 2009 to pursue his own ideas about creating interactive digital books. Inkling currently offers a variety of digital textbooks with interactive features, including the ability to share notes with classmates and instructors, via an iPad app.
    "When you think about what Apple is doing... they are selling tens of thousands of iPads into K-12 institutions," MacInnis told Ars. "What are they doing with those iPads? They don't really replace textbooks, because there's not very much content on offer," he said.
    Don't expect that content to come directly from Apple, however. "Practically speaking, Apple does not want to get into the content publishing business," MacInnis said. Like the music and movie industries, Apple has instead built a distribution platform as well as hardware to consume it—but Apple isn't a record label or production studio.
    But what Apple does provide is industry-leading tools for content production, such as Logic or Final Cut Pro, to help create content. The company also produces tools like GarageBand or iMovie that make such production accessible to a much wider audience.
    Will Apple launch a sort of GarageBand for e-books? "That's what we believe you're about to see," MacInnis told Ars (and our other sources agree). "Publishing something to ePub is very similar to publishing web content. Remember iWeb? That iWeb code didn't just get flushed down the toilet—I think you'll see some of [that code] repurposed."
    Mobile, social learning

    Technology-in-education expert Dr. William Rankin also believes digital books will expand with tools that will enable social interactions among textbook users. Rankin, who serves as Director of Educational Innovation of Abilene Christian University and has extensively researched the use of mobile devices in the classroom, was one of three authors of a white paper on the effects of digital convergence on learning titled "Code/X," published in 2009.
    In that document, Rankin and his colleagues laid out their vision for the future of learning, which included an always-on, always-networked digital device called a "Talos." That device turned out to be very similar to the iPad that Apple announced just six months later.
    "What we saw coming was a change in the kinds of places that learning would happen," Rankin told Ars. Since the device would always be with the student, it would give her access to information anytime and anywhere. "For that, you need a different kind of book."
    Such digital texts would let students interact with information in visual ways, such as 3D models, graphs, and videos. They would also allow students to create links to additional texts, audio, and other supporting materials. Furthermore, students could share those connections with classmates and colleagues.
    "What we really believe is important is the role of social networking in a converged learning environment," Rankin told Ars. "We're already seeing that in Inkling's platform, and Kno's journaling feature. Future digital texts should allow students to layer all kind of other data, such as pictures, and notes, and then share that with the class or, ideally, anyone."
    Exactly how what Apple announces on Thursday will impact digital publishing isn't certain, however.
    "Think about how meaningful simply authoring and publishing to an iPad will be for K-12," MacInnis said. "However, it might not be great for molecular biology."
    MacInnis sees Apple as possibly up-ending the traditional print publishing model for the low-end, where basic information has for many years remained locked behind high textbook prices. Apple can "kick up dust with the education market," which could then create visibility for platforms like Inkling. This could then serve as a sort of professional Logic-type tool for interactive textbook creation complement to Apple's "GarageBand for e-books."
    "There will be a spectrum of tools and consumers, and we will continue to fit on that spectrum," MacInnis opined. "I don't know if the publishing industry will react to it with fear or enthusiasm."
    Steve Jobs' pet project

    We know that former Apple CEO Steve Jobs was working on addressing learning and digital textbooks for some time, according to Walter Issacson's biography. Jobs believed that textbook publishing was an "$8 billion a year industry ripe for digital destruction."
    According to our sources close to his efforts, however, Jobs' personal involvement was perhaps more significant that even his biography purports. Jobs worked on this project for several years, and our understanding is that the final outcome was slated to be announced in October 2011 in conjunction with the iPhone 4S. Those plans were postponed at the last minute, perhaps due to Jobs' imminent death.
    Despite the delay, however, ACU's Rankin believes the time is right for a change to happen in the field. "We're headed toward a completely digital future at ACU," he told Ars. "A recent study showed that 82 percent of all higher education students nationwide will come to campus with a smartphone. We need to have resources and tools ready for these mobile, connected students."

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    7,016
    Post Thanks / Like

    Before shutdown, Megaupload ate up more corporate bandwidth than Dropbox

    Before being shut down by the feds today, the file-sharing site Megaupload was extraordinarily popular with home Internet users—so much so that the file downloading habit was spilling over into the workplace in a significant way.
    The shutdown of the site—and the arrests of four of Megaupload's leaders today in New Zealand—are bound to have major consequences in the file sharing market. Although Megaupload's presence in the corporate world may not have matched its overall share of Internet usage, its consumption of bandwidth was outpacing Dropbox and numerous other business-focused file-sharing services, according to a new study. BitTorrent is also quite popular in the workplace, and some people are even installing Tor clients on their work machines to conceal details of their Internet usage, the study found.
    The data comes from security vendor Palo Alto Networks, which used its technology to monitor a week's worth of traffic traversing the Internet gateway at 1,636 businesses around the world, mostly at medium to large businesses with at least 2,500 users. The eighth version of the resulting report, published every six months, came out this week.
    "The key point is that this is real network traffic, it's not a survey. It's not speculation on anyone's part," said Matt Keil, Palo Alto senior research analyst.
    We spoke with Palo Alto prior to today's news that Megaupload.com was taken down by the FBI, with the Justice Department unsealing an indictment that charges seven people associated with the site with "widespread online copyright infringement." We were planning to report on the data anyway—and today's news makes it even more interesting.
    Megaupload usage was found on the networks of 57 percent of the 1,636 organizations in the study. That's quite a bit less than the 76 percent of networks with Dropbox traffic, and equal to the 57 percent of networks that have Box.net traffic. However, in terms of bandwidth, Megaupload accounted for 20,405 gigabytes, compared to 17,573 for Dropbox and just 86 gigabytes for the business-focused Box.net. The Dropbox numbers, indicating lots of traffic but a smaller average file size, suggest a mix of personal and work usage. Another consumer-oriented service accounting for a chunk of traffic was Filesonic, which appeared on 52 percent of networks and consumed 4,058 gigabytes.
    Overall, Palo Alto tracked 76,225 gigabytes worth of traffic being used up by some 65 browser-based file sharing applications (including Dropbox, even though the Dropbox service can be used outside the browser). Counting only Web-based file-sharing, then, Megaupload accounted for more than a quarter of corporate traffic.
    However, Web-based file sharing is still just a small part of overall Internet usage in corporations. Looking at all types of applications and use cases, Palo Alto found 10.9 million gigabytes of consumption across the 1,636 companies. In fact, the BitTorrent peer-to-peer service alone accounted for much more traffic than all browser-based file-sharing applications combined, with 177,513 gigabytes of bandwidth consumed, or less than 2 percent of all corporate Internet traffic.
    Proportionally, BitTorrent and Megaupload likely have a much greater share of the Internet as a whole than they do in corporate networks. One previous study by Envisional pegged BitTorrent as taking up 13.5 percent of peak bandwidth usage in the US and 28.4 percent in Europe, and also said downloads from cyberlocker sites such as Megaupload, Rapidshare and HotFile take up 7 percent of all Internet traffic.
    Still, when Palo Alto reports back to customers on the usage of Web-based file sharing, the reaction is usually "I knew I had some of these applications on my network, but I didn't realize I had so many," Keil said.
    Although Dropbox seems to straddle the line between personal and business use, in most cases there's usually a clear distinction between "tools that help me get my job done and tools that help us stay entertained," with business-focused services usually transferring smaller files, Keil said. Yousendit, for example, is mostly used for productivity and was found in 51 percent of networks, but accounted for just 423 gigabaytes.
    Megaupload clocks in with big numbers because of the types of files being shared. "Of the top-20 file downloads found on December 5th, 2011, six of the files were software applications, eight were games or game demos, and six were movie trailers," the Palo Alto report states.
    Interestingly, Tor client software for encrypting a user's traffic was found on 13 percent of corporate networks. Palo Alto didn't detail this usage in its report because of how low it was, accounting for 0.077 percent of bandwidth. Companies with a Tor presence might have it on just one or two machines. But certainly, it's something any IT security pro will want to locate and get rid of.
    Tor "is not really that trivial of a tool to use," said Wade Williamson, Palo Alto senior security analyst. "Tor is kind of a pre-requisite tool if you're going to be a hacker. If I'm going to attack someone's network i'm definitely going to use Tor or something like it so people can't follow my footsteps and see where they come from." Palo Alto's research didn't determine what exactly people were using Tor to do. "It's hard to say if they're hackers," Wade said. "Someone could have heard this is the best way to anonymize yourself. We're not saying all these are hackers, but there is definitely a security issue there."
    It turns out that Tor's presence has remained steady in the 13 to 14 percent range in all of Palo Alto's previous reports, the company said. Megaupload traffic also hasn't changed much recently. But it will, if the site stays shut down for long.

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    7,016
    Post Thanks / Like
    Educators hope Apple's textbook foray will begin a "learning revolution"

    On Thursday morning, Apple announced a series of related initiatives designed to modernize learning based around its iPad tablet. Apple is hoping to "reinvent textbooks" and change the way we learn with an updated iBooks 2 app, which works with interactive textbooks built with the iBooks Author desktop app, and an expansion of iTunes U that offers course materials and K-12 access. And according to several experts we spoke to, Apple's announcement today could do just that.

    Several educators were particularly bullish on the impact that Apple's move into the digital textbook market will have on both teaching and learning. Assistant Professor of Arts, Media, and Design at Boston's Northeastern University Matthew Gray told Ars that iBooks 2 and iBooks Author will be a "fantastic" improvement over what's commonly used in universities now.
    "A pivotal year for students"

    "Personally, I love this development" Gray said. "What was funny to me was the continuous emphasis on the word 'book.' But what Apple's new technology says to me, however, is 'syllabus.' This new kind of ebook acknowledges that we all can Google things, and therefore education needs something to bridge 'fixed' knowledge and 'fluid' delivery systems for knowledge. An e-book can use its unique referencing ability to link a far wider resource library to students."

    Abilene Christian Univeristy's director of educational innovation, Dr. William Rankin, also believes Apple's digital textbooks and iTunes U expansion will have a major transformative effect. "Teachers no longer have to have an IT department, digital infrastructure, or really even buy-in from their school," Rankin told Ars. "Apps, notes, syllabi, textbooks—they all integrate. As long as I can get iPads for my students, I can do it all."

    (A seemingly easy feat for Rankin, whose institution has been active in putting iPads in students' hands. Other universities, however, may not have it as easy.)

    Rankin further explained that iBooks Author and iTunes U could "disrupt the relationship" between teachers and schools. "This will democratize the relationship between content producers and consumers. A teacher will be able to do anything they need for their class, and not be as dependent on textbook publishers or school administrations."

    He described the potential for a revolution in learning comparable to Gutenberg's introduction of the printing press. Interactive digital texts like those demonstrated by Apple will allow learning to "transgress walls," and the iPad's mobility will allow learning to happen "in situ," in whatever context is most appropriate.

    "It used to be about location, location, location. Now it's all about connection, connection, connection," Rankin told Ars. "It will take people a long time to realize the implications of that."

    That feeling is shared by Brad Wheeler, vice president of information technology at Indiana University, who has been running a very successful e-text program at IU. That program, along with help from IU, is being expanded on a pilot basis to five new universities in Spring 2012, including UC-Berkeley, Cornell, Minnesota, Virginia, and Wisconsin.

    Wheeler believes that Apple's announcements will be a shot in the arm for the kind of digital text programs he supports. "The economics of college textbooks are structurally flawed and are failing students, authors, professors and publishers," Wheeler told Ars. "Different approaches, including free resources and companies trying to restructure the industry—as Apple did for music—are in play."

    But the change can't come soon enough, Wheeler explained. "2012 is looking to be a pivotal year for students, authors, and publishers, as we finally reform entrenched textbook practices that fail everyone, but especially fail our students. Billions are being allocated to author Open Educational Resources, Apple is credibly seeking to apply its platform and transform the textbook business starting with K-12, and universities are taking the lead in cutting money-saving deals directly with publishers."

    "We need more of all of this, and faster," Wheeler said.
    The iPad requirement

    Still, adopting iPads for every student gives rise to cost concerns. Schools may negotiate bulk deals with Apple to provide iPads to every student, though tight budgets often rule out the iPad, even with an education discount as low as $420. Those costs may shift to parents as students may be expected to bring their own device.

    "If you are a very small school and you can afford to offer your students an iPad, great," Mehdi Maghsoodnia, CEO of BookRenter, told Ars. "If you are a large school district, then you are probably not going to be able to do this. That means that a small percentage of students who can afford iPads will purchase the digital versions of their textbooks."

    While an iPad can represent an expensive up-front cost, however, the ability to have the most up-to-date information and Apple's downward pressure on textbook prices may more than make up for the difference.

    "Traditional textbooks start at $90," one K-12 teacher told Ars. "$15 texts can now actually make the iPad a cost savings for districts.

    Wes Molyneaux, a science teacher a technology expert for New Trier High School in Winnetka, Illinois, agrees that lower text costs will actually make an iPad more attractive.

    "Right now the Pearson Biology text is selling for $75.00 on Amazon," Molyneaux told Ars. "In the iBookstore it is selling for $14.99."

    iBooks Author also offers important advantages for both teachers and students. "Teacher-created content that aligns with their own curriculum just became easier to author," Molyneaux said. "We can now create our own content that matches what we want to cover. And a high school student could create a project using the new iBooks Author app and be able to put it out there for other students to read. This creates real-world learning opportunities that were not there yesterday."
    Let's talk about rights

    But costs aren't the only concern. Apple's closed platform still presents challenges for publishers, authors, and students. Oman Rashid, CEO of digital textbook company Kno, told Ars that supporting multiple platforms will be an important part of changing the landscape of education. "Public schools and universities aren't likely to say, 'Forever I'm going to choose one platform,'" Rashid told Ars. "We're on multiple platforms, not just the iPad."

    "I'm really excited by Apple's entry into the market," Rashid said. "It will boost the entire industry. I want to see how publishers respond, because publishers will have to be able to build content for platforms other than the iPad."

    And though students will have permanent access to a text once purchased, including free updates to content and unlimited re-downloads, what will student be able to do with the content? Intellectual property lawyer Nazli Saka, who also holds a masters degree in education from Harvard, thinks this question will need answers, and soon.

    "There's no denying that this new textbook experience will revolutionize learning and education," Saka told Ars. "But will Apple be willing to let users interact with the textbooks on multiple digital platforms and not just the iPad?" So far, according to the EULA for iBooks Author, that answer seems to be "no."

    "How about ownership of content?" Saka asked. "If Apple owns it, then it could presumably withdraw it anytime it wants, thus leaving students without textbooks at the time of need. How will end user license agreements be constructed so that students can print portions of the books and use them for class work without infringing any copyrights? As an IP lawyer, I'm cautious," she said

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    7,016
    Post Thanks / Like
    7 People Charged in Connection to Megaupload Site

    The federal authorities on Thursday announced that they had charged seven people connected to the Web site Megaupload, including its founder, with running an international criminal enterprise centered on copyright infringement on the Internet.

    According to a grand jury indictment, Megaupload — one of the most popular “locker” services on the Internet, which lets users anonymously transfer large files — generated $175 million in income for its operators through subscription fees and advertising, while causing $500 million in damages to copyright holders.

    Four of the seven people, including the site’s founder Kim Dotcom, born Kim Schmitz, have been arrested in New Zealand, the Justice Department and Federal Bureau of Investigation said on Thursday; the three others remain at large. The seven — who a grand jury indictment calls part of a “Mega Conspiracy” — have been charged with five counts of copyright infringement and conspiracy, the authorities said.

    The charges, which the government agencies said represented “among the largest criminal copyright cases ever brought by the United States,” come at a charged time, a day after online protests against a pair of antipiracy bills being considered by Congress — the Stop Online Piracy Act, or SOPA, in the House, and the Protect I.P. Act, or PIPA, in the Senate.

    The indictment was handed down by a grand jury in Virginia two weeks ago, but was unsealed on Thursday, and stems from a federal investigation that began two years ago.

    The Megaupload case touches on many of the most controversial aspects of the antipiracy debate.

    Megaupload and similar locker sites, like Rapidshare and Mediafire, are often promoted as being convenient ways to legitimately transfer large files — a recent promotional video had major stars like Will.i.am of the Black Eyed Peas singing Megaupload’s praises. But they have become notorious among media companies, who see them as abetting copyright infringement on a large scale by giving people easy, but unauthorized, access to movies, music and other content.

    Megaupload is currently engaged in a lawsuit with Universal over the promotional video and Universal’s efforts to have it removed from YouTube.

    As part of the crackdown on Megaupload, 20 search warrants were executed in nine countries, including the United States. About $50 million in assets were also seized, as well as a number of servers and 18 domain names, the authorities said.

    Ira P. Rothken, a lawyer for Megaupload, said in a phone interview on Thursday afternoon that he had not yet seen the indictment, but he added: “Clearly we have due process concerns. This was done without a hearing.”

  8. #23
    houmanbahal's Avatar
    houmanbahal is offline Streaming/Media Team
    ISP Managers Team
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    22,005
    Post Thanks / Like
    That is f*ked up!!!!!1
    6 -0 Yadet Nareeee
    .سوبله چوبله شش تای شد
    Emperator Hich Vaght Yadet Nareeeee
    10 Daghighe, 10 Nafare, 3ta Goal Hich Vaght Yadet Nare
    Sarvar Man. United

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    3,049
    Post Thanks / Like
    In the market for two new phone? I've using blackberry bold for the past two years for mostly email. Any suggestion? Should I wait for the next version Iphone?
    بارالها، ما حال نداریم به راه راست هدایت شویم، خودت راه راست را به سوی ما کج کن

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    7,016
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by YePaDoPa View Post
    In the market for two new phone? I've using blackberry bold for the past two years for mostly email. Any suggestion? Should I wait for the next version Iphone?
    I think Blackberry is great for e-mail and browsing but it is more personal interest

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    7,016
    Post Thanks / Like
    RIM's CEOs Step Down, Thorsten Heins Appointed as New CEO

    That's what you get for not delivering. As had been anticipated for a while now, the two co-CEOs of Research In Motion, Mike Lazaridis and Jim Balsillie, will step down from their posts. Chief operating officer Thorsten Heins will take over the role of CEO, while the two former co-CEOs will move to other functions within the company.

    RIM held a fairly good market position in especially North America, but after the arrival of the iPhone, and later Android, the company plunged into an unguided freefall. RIM is one of the two victims of the iPhone/Android one-two punch (the other is Nokia) who didn't manage to re-invent itself in any significant way. Heads were bound to roll at some point.

    "Mike and Jim took a bold step 18 months ago when RIM purchased QNX to shepherd the transformation of the BlackBerry platform for the next decade," Heins said, "We are more confident than ever that was the right path. It is Mike and Jim's continued unwillingness to sacrifice long-term value for short-term gain which has made RIM the great company that it is today. I share that philosophy and am very excited about the company's future."

    "As with any company that has grown as fast as we have, there have been inevitable growing pains. We have learned from those challenges and, I believe, we have and will become a stronger company as a result," he added, "Going forward, we will continue to focus both on short-term and long-term growth, strategic planning, a customer and market-based product approach, and flawless execution. We are in the process of recruiting a new chief marketing officer to work closely with our product and sales teams to deliver the most compelling products and services."

    Even though it's no guarantee, I do believe RIM has all the right pieces of the puzzle from a technology standpoint. They make good and reliable hardware, have the corporate backing, and own a software stack, QNX, that has been designed from day one to run on extremely constrained hardware. All they need now is someone with the vision to tie it all together to create a compelling package.

    I don't know the good man, but after watching this introductory video, I just don't think he's the right man to do so. Of course, judging someone by watching a video is a bit silly, but when I listen to, say, Microsoft's Sinofsky or Apple's Ive, they clearly come across as people that have an idea of where they want their products to go. Heins, on the other hand, sounds like he's ticking off the company PR talk checklist.

    We'll see where it all goes, but I'm not exactly bringing with confidence. At this point, I just hope QNX will be properly open sourced before RIM goes belly-up or is acquired by Microsoft or whatever.

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    7,016
    Post Thanks / Like

    Apple Reports Bizarre First Quarter Results

    Apple reported its quarterly results, and thanks to the iPhone 4S and the iPad, Apple is putting out bizarre figures - 37 million iPhones, 15.5 million iPads. "The Company sold 37.04 million iPhones in the quarter, representing 128 percent unit growth over the year-ago quarter. Apple sold 15.43 million iPads during the quarter, a 111 percent unit increase over the year-ago quarter. The Company sold 5.2 million Macs during the quarter, a 26 percent unit increase over the year-ago quarter. Apple sold 15.4 million iPods, a 21 percent unit decline from the year-ago quarter."

  13. #28
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    2,777
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by Iran-Esteghlal-Inter View Post
    IBM's 'atomic memory' makes storage 100 times denser

    My X's father was one of the inventors behind STM (Scanning Tunneling Microscope) and he was telling me few years back that they are able to represent data @ atomic levels and they are working on the speed.

  14. #29
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    7,016
    Post Thanks / Like
    Great article about how the big companies such as google save data

    http://arstechnica.com/business/news...e-big-data.ars

  15. #30
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    7,016
    Post Thanks / Like
    Android's share of tablet market jumps

    The Android operating system's share of the global tablet computer market has risen sharply at the expense of Apple's iOS, research suggests.

    Android accounted for 39% of the market in the final three months of last year, up from 29% a year earlier, Strategy Analytics said. Apple's share fell to 58% from 68%.

    Microsoft's share stood at 1.5%.

    Shipments of tablets reached 26.8 million in the quarter, up from 10.7 million a year ago.

    "Demand for tablets among consumer, business and education users remains strong," said Strategy Analytics' Peter King.

    Apple shipped 15.4 million iPads between October and December. That compares with shipments of 10.5 million tablets using Android.

    For 2011 as a whole, shipments hit 66.9 million, up from 18.6 million in 2010.

    Android is used by a number of tablet manufacturers, including Amazon and Samsung.

    It is also one of the most-used operating systems in the global smartphone market, although the latest figures suggest Apple has overtaken Android in the US.

    According to figures from Kantar Worldpanel, Apple took 44.9% of market share in the US in the 12 weeks to 25 December, compared with 44.8% for Android.

    Last month, the 10 billionth app was downloaded from the Android Market, and some analysts expect the operating system to overtake Apple in terms of app downloads in the coming months.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-16736609

 

 

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •