BBQ thread

Feb 4, 2005
16,677
1,314
#1
In the old house I had a Weber BBQ that worked with the gas line from the fire place & fire pit. I thought of saving the BBQ & converting it to a propane using one but found out its not easy. I have been using my Iranian manghal & charcoals & I prefer it but sometimes I am too lazy & just want to grill some steaks. Lately have been thinking of making a heavy duty outside kitchen with 2 BBQs (One charcoal & one gas) & a pizza oven that would be used for a tanoore noon also. However this is an expensive project that will probably be next year. Right now I want to buy an inexpensive BBQ (propane) that has a ledge for skewers (My weber has it & most of the BBQ don't). Any recommendations?
 

artavile

IPL Player
Oct 18, 2002
3,660
2
MD, USA
#2
.. Right now I want to buy an inexpensive BBQ (propane) that has a ledge for skewers (My weber has it & most of the BBQ don't). Any recommendations?
My recommendation is don't spend your money on temporary fix, if I were you I’ll wait till next year to build the dream outdoor kitchen, use whatever you already have. Besides, there are so many reasonably priced restaurants in your neck of the woods that makes homemade cooking less desirable.

p.s., it feels awkward giving financial advice to an Esfahani hamvatan. :)
 
Jun 9, 2004
13,753
0
Canada
#3
In the old house I had a Weber BBQ that worked with the gas line from the fire place & fire pit. I thought of saving the BBQ & converting it to a propane using one but found out its not easy. I have been using my Iranian manghal & charcoals & I prefer it but sometimes I am too lazy & just want to grill some steaks. Lately have been thinking of making a heavy duty outside kitchen with 2 BBQs (One charcoal & one gas) & a pizza oven that would be used for a tanoore noon also. However this is an expensive project that will probably be next year. Right now I want to buy an inexpensive BBQ (propane) that has a ledge for skewers (My weber has it & most of the BBQ don't). Any recommendations?
Do you already have the gas line installed Siavash jaan? Even if you don't, it doesn't really cost that much to run the gas line and you'd have to do this next year anyway. So, why don't you just buy the gas BBQ (i.e. 1/3 of the system that you want to put in next year)? That way, you're not really wasting any money. I have the Weber Genesis and I'm really happy with it, particularly for steaks. If the whole point of not using the manghal is being lazy ;) there's nothing more annoying that getting refills on that propane tank!
 

OSTAD POOYA

National Team Player
Jan 26, 2004
4,655
405
#4
There are a few things when it comes to grilling. The term barbeque is actually associated with a method of long cooking that can take 2-7 hours based on what you are cooking. It is based on length of cooking, and the temperature not being on high to provide direct heat. This is used for tougher meats such as shoulder, brisket, or ribs. For this type of cooking you definitely want to use charcoal to let the real taste sit in but gas can be used as well. Now going to grilling the cost of running a propane tank versus using charcoal is actually about 1/7 to 1/8 lower overtime. Another thing you want to keep in mind is that at those high temperatures you are not really placing the flavor or charcoal into the meat as its cooked so fast. Now if you let the charcoal cool down a while and then start cooking it may give you a better taste slightly but not much different overall with all the marinating and sauces involved. I suggest for the time being you go with a small BBQ from homedepot that uses propane. They cost about $99 to $199 based on size and even the $99 one will do a great job for you. I use one of these due to size for making kabob, fish, and steaks and it works greatly.



http://www.homedepot.com/p/Brinkman...-Gas-Grill-810-3330-SB/202974040#.UfKTNHfhd8E



http://www.homedepot.com/p/Maxfire-...-Gas-Grill-810-9213-SB/203679876#.UfKR43fhd8E
 
Feb 4, 2005
16,677
1,314
#5
My recommendation is don't spend your money on temporary fix, if I were you I’ll wait till next year to build the dream outdoor kitchen, use whatever you already have. Besides, there are so many reasonably priced restaurants in your neck of the woods that makes homemade cooking less desirable.
p.s., it feels awkward giving financial advice to an Esfahani hamvatan. :)
You haven't tasted my kabob barg & koobideh & chenjeh Arti jan. There is not one restaurant in my area that is good enough except for a couple of steakhouses which I have to spend a minimum of $60 per person ($240).
 
Feb 4, 2005
16,677
1,314
#7
Do you already have the gas line installed Siavash jaan? Even if you don't, it doesn't really cost that much to run the gas line and you'd have to do this next year anyway. So, why don't you just buy the gas BBQ (i.e. 1/3 of the system that you want to put in next year)? That way, you're not really wasting any money. I have the Weber Genesis and I'm really happy with it, particularly for steaks. If the whole point of not using the manghal is being lazy ;) there's nothing more annoying that getting refills on that propane tank!

Good point BH jan. I didn't think about that since the last time I had a propane BBQ was 1999.
 
Feb 4, 2005
16,677
1,314
#8
There are a few things when it comes to grilling. The term barbeque is actually associated with a method of long cooking that can take 2-7 hours based on what you are cooking. It is based on length of cooking, and the temperature not being on high to provide direct heat. This is used for tougher meats such as shoulder, brisket, or ribs. For this type of cooking you definitely want to use charcoal to let the real taste sit in but gas can be used as well. Now going to grilling the cost of running a propane tank versus using charcoal is actually about 1/7 to 1/8 lower overtime. Another thing you want to keep in mind is that at those high temperatures you are not really placing the flavor or charcoal into the meat as its cooked so fast. Now if you let the charcoal cool down a while and then start cooking it may give you a better taste slightly but not much different overall with all the marinating and sauces involved. I suggest for the time being you go with a small BBQ from homedepot that uses propane. They cost about $99 to $199 based on size and even the $99 one will do a great job for you. I use one of these due to size for making kabob, fish, and steaks and it works greatly.



http://www.homedepot.com/p/Brinkman...-Gas-Grill-810-3330-SB/202974040#.UfKTNHfhd8E



http://www.homedepot.com/p/Maxfire-...-Gas-Grill-810-9213-SB/203679876#.UfKR43fhd8E


It sounds like you know your BBQ OP jan.
The cost you mentioned might even be more since I always use natural charcoal. Oon zoghal khooba ke ba rafighe bad agar biad adam ra az raah dar mikoned.:puffpuff:
 
Feb 4, 2005
16,677
1,314
#9
please share some of your secrets.
Only the barg needs a lot of "foot & fan". The koobideh & chenje are pretty straight forward. For koobideh I use 22% fat & make sure I get rid of the excess onion water so the meat doesn't fall off the skewer. For chenje if I use filet the marination doesn't even have to be over night but for top sirloin or London broil I marinate it overnight so the meat doesn't get tough. I use advieh haft rang & @ brush it with a majoon of butter & saffron.
 
Feb 4, 2005
16,677
1,314
#12
Thanks ZA. when you have time tell us about the "foot & fan" of making barg.
Depending on how much money you want to spend you could use London broil ($$) or Top sirloin ($$$) or Filet mignon ($$$$$). The cheaper cuts will be chewier but some people like it that way. Cut them in 3 inch by 1/2 inch pieces. Marinate them in grated onions and whatever spices you like overnight. Next day put them on skewers and cut the sides so they look nice and same size. Put them on a cutting board and beat them up with another skewer every which way. Turn them around and beat them again. The more you beat the better as long as you don't rip them. Add the excess meat that you cut off earlier to the skewer & beat it again (it should stick to it like glew). Put them on a natural charcoal fire with one skewer of tomatoes and peppers (I big ones are not as spicy as the little ones). While they are on the fire brush them with the majoon of kareh & saffron for flavor & so they don't burn. Nooshe jan!
 
Oct 20, 2003
9,345
1
#13
Only the barg needs a lot of "foot & fan". The koobideh & chenje are pretty straight forward. For koobideh I use 22% fat & make sure I get rid of the excess onion water so the meat doesn't fall off the skewer. For chenje if I use filet the marination doesn't even have to be over night but for top sirloin or London broil I marinate it overnight so the meat doesn't get tough. I use advieh haft rang & @ brush it with a majoon of butter & saffron.
That is the key. I will use that onion water for marination with couple of other ingredients. Man 22% fat will start a two alarm fire.
majoon? Sia JAn, In my velayat majoon has a different meaning ;).
 
Feb 4, 2005
16,677
1,314
#14
That is the key. I will use that onion water for marination with couple of other ingredients. Man 22% fat will start a two alarm fire.

majoon? Sia JAn, In my velayat majoon has a different meaning ;).
Yeah abpiaz is good for marinating the chenje or jooje. Doesn't majoon mean tarkeeb? What does it mean in Ahvaz?
 

Playboy

IPL Player
Oct 18, 2010
4,526
446
#17
Depending on how much money you want to spend you could use London broil ($$) or Top sirloin ($$$) or Filet mignon ($$$$$). The cheaper cuts will be chewier but some people like it that way. Cut them in 3 inch by 1/2 inch pieces. Marinate them in grated onions and whatever spices you like overnight. Next day put them on skewers and cut the sides so they look nice and same size. Put them on a cutting board and beat them up with another skewer every which way. Turn them around and beat them again. The more you beat the better as long as you don't rip them. Add the excess meat that you cut off earlier to the skewer & beat it again (it should stick to it like glew). Put them on a natural charcoal fire with one skewer of tomatoes and peppers (I big ones are not as spicy as the little ones). While they are on the fire brush them with the majoon of kareh & saffron for flavor & so they don't burn. Nooshe jan!
i would not torture any filet mignon cut of meat like that at all.it does not need any marination either and i would add spice/butter while grilling it.our local costco is lately selling usda prime top sirloin which is also an excellent cut for shish kabob or barg but not as good as filet.the marination process is a myth if you got a good cut of meat you don't need it.
 
Feb 4, 2005
16,677
1,314
#18
i would not torture any filet mignon cut of meat like that at all.it does not need any marination either and i would add spice/butter while grilling it.our local costco is lately selling usda prime top sirloin which is also an excellent cut for shish kabob or barg but not as good as filet.the marination process is a myth if you got a good cut of meat you don't need it.
Of course you don't need it for Filet but you definitely need it for lower grade meats. The marination gives the meat flavor & its not just for tenderizing. Kiwi is also a good tenderizer.
 

artavile

IPL Player
Oct 18, 2002
3,660
2
MD, USA
#19
Bah bah the sweet subject of grill!

Looks like we have some grill masters around here. ZA jan, one thing that might be a little difficult to get though is the 22% fat ratio. There are plently of conventional meat to fat ratios like 80% to 20%, 85% to 15%, 90% to 10% or even 95% to 5% but I don't remember seeing 78% to 22%.

I am now very motivated to put your recipe in a good use this weekend. :)

One thing I should mention about kiwi is be careful not to overuse it. It can over tenderize your meat, specially on chicken.
 

OSTAD POOYA

National Team Player
Jan 26, 2004
4,655
405
#20
Marinating is not needed for meats which are generally aged. If you get aged meats that are salted and then aged anywhere from 6 weeks to 3 months in a cool place and no air flow then the marinating is not necessary. With meats which are just grabbed from the market you definitely need to add some ingredients to it to actually bring out the flavor. Marinating does on a much lower level what aging does to the meat. Kiwi is to be used only for short periods of time as the acids in it will destroy the meat if used too long. You generally want to rub it on about 10-15 prior to cooking the meat as longer periods will make the meat much softer and it would fall apart. And this is recommended for tough meats. Your softer meats will not need kiwi on them. If you are a patient person it’s always good to take your time and slow cook to truly bring out the flavor of the meat which is being cooked. If you like cheese you can obtain some pepper jack cheese and place it on red or orange bell pepper once they are cut to small pieces and on the BBQ for about 15 min. It will melt right in and tastes delicious especially if you are having sausages. Argentinian beef sausages goes very well with that mix!

ZA jaan the 22% seems very high brother… Truly fattening even though the whole taste of koobideh does come with the fat. I too blend the onion and then put it in a few paper towels and press to get all the juices out. Pure blended onion mixed with the beef does work wonders. If you like a Jalapeno Salmon cheese burger I can also provide you with a recipe which is to die for.