Stock/commodities Discussion

It's still unbelievable to me how pathetic and weak others like Walmart and Home Depot have been at generating online sales. Their sites, shipping and overall buying experience is absolutely horrendous compared to what Amazon was 5 years ago, let alone now. I don't think Jeff Bezos himself can believe it.
 
Oct 18, 2002
16,337
195
It's still unbelievable to me how pathetic and weak others like Walmart and Home Depot have been at generating online sales. Their sites, shipping and overall buying experience is absolutely horrendous compared to what Amazon was 5 years ago, let alone now. I don't think Jeff Bezos himself can believe it.
they are run by classic CEOs with no vision. who are just moving around numbers.

every truck driver dreads going to walmart because it takes 8 hours to unload their truck.

you go to a Walmart store. the people are so dismally trained they have no idea how to get on a radio and ask people where a certain product is.

every $hitty company is run by some fucking accountant or a lawyer.
 
Oct 18, 2002
16,337
195
Bache Tehroon while I don't have $1000 i have $500 i can get two stocks of VOO now and get the ball rolling.
I mean if now is the time to strke let's do it!
if you are committed to do this for next 10-30 years. theoretically it does not matter when you buy.
you just take the emotion out of it. you are like buy
$1000 or $500 bucks every three months of an ETFS i.e VOO.

sometimes it will be up (hopefully more times) and sometimes it will be down. configure your automatic reinvestment and hopefully
if the market goes up in the long term (unlike japan) then you have dollar cost averaged and you will be fine.

but it is important to emphasize this. you will have to stick to it. you cannot suddenly cancel the whole thing.
 
Likes: Bache Tehroon

Hooshmand

National Team Player
Oct 12, 2011
8,562
844
UK
wait a day. this may be a falling knife for a few days. Got your account set up and funded already? You have to be ready to hit that 'buy' button inside your discount brokerage's system. What's the trading fee?
BT give us a shout when the time is right please.
VOO is a good index but any shares do you recommend BT? How about Microsoft and Boeing?
 
BT give us a shout when the time is right please.
VOO is a good index but any shares do you recommend BT? How about Microsoft and Boeing?
Of course Microsoft and Boeing are shares that everyone should own, but in my opinion no amateur investor should ever hold these positions as individual stocks. You and I simply don't know enough about the internals of the company and their sector to be able to make an educated bet. We're merely speculating. For that reason, it's better to speculate on entire sectors or a big number of equity symbols to achieve diversification and reduce risk.

I have calculated Microsoft to be roughly 1.5% of my entire portfolio (one of the biggest in there). That's the amount of risk I'm willing to take betting on a single name as strong as Microsoft, let alone other smaller players. I could not achieve that level of diversification by buying Microsoft's stock individually. Well I could, but then I'd have to own 200 other stocks!
 
Likes: Hooshmand
if you are committed to do this for next 10-30 years. theoretically it does not matter when you buy.
you just take the emotion out of it. you are like buy
$1000 or $500 bucks every three months of an ETFS i.e VOO.

sometimes it will be up (hopefully more times) and sometimes it will be down. configure your automatic reinvestment and hopefully
if the market goes up in the long term (unlike japan) then you have dollar cost averaged and you will be fine.

but it is important to emphasize this. you will have to stick to it. you cannot suddenly cancel the whole thing.
Very true. As I've always said, it's very important to add to your investments on a very consistent basis (monthly, quarterly, weekly, whatever) regardless of price with the intention of holding them forever. I can't emphasize enough how important the word "forever" is in this context. Never intend to sell your assets. No one has ever built wealth by selling assets or exiting an investment class entirely.
 
Likes: ChaharMahal
Oct 18, 2002
16,337
195
Of course Microsoft and Boeing are shares that everyone should own, but in my opinion no amateur investor should ever hold these positions as individual stocks. You and I simply don't know enough about the internals of the company and their sector to be able to make an educated bet. We're merely speculating. For that reason, it's better to speculate on entire sectors or a big number of equity symbols to achieve diversification and reduce risk.

I have calculated Microsoft to be roughly 1.5% of my entire portfolio (one of the biggest in there). That's the amount of risk I'm willing to take betting on a single name as strong as Microsoft, let alone other smaller players. I could not achieve that level of diversification by buying Microsoft's stock individually. Well I could, but then I'd have to own 200 other stocks!
for those of you who are wondering why buying even stable companies like MSFT might not be a good idea for you and I is this.

the so called hedge funds (who are almost always long).

don't buy companies just based on their fundamental. they have a lot of "illegal" insider news.

so they have things like corporate intel network for instance. they know when microsoft might change pricing scheme for Azure.
They know when Amazon might do prime price change or ...
they can time their trades better and decide what stock might do better than the other.

but this specially true in the case of drug companies. these mofos have all kinds of internal trail data
that they can guess or FDA is gone approve their new shitty drug or not.

you and I dont have access to that kind of information.
 
Likes: Bache Tehroon
Exactly, and of those hedge-funds who claim to be 'informed', 99% are simply making bogus claims. That's why the vast majority of hedge-funds fail to outperform a vanilla index like VOO or SPY.

It's a good idea to own companies that you like, but it's even a better idea to own companies that you don't like. I personally hate Amazon and Facebook. I own both. I hate how Google is involved in every aspect of our lives right now without any oversight. I own that one too. I hate my cell provider. Yup, I own them too. Their success doesn't bother me as much as it could. It benefits me. If one day they go bankrupt, I lose a small percentage of my money and actually feel relieved about it. That's how you can stick it to your utility, hydro, cell-service and cable provider too. Own them.

Hate your bank and how they make money off your mortgage interest? Own them.
Hate your insurance provider and how you throw money at them every month? Own them.

Own everything. Own the banks that are ruling this world. They will never stop making money in your lifetime. Become a shareholder and be a part of it instead of resenting them.
 
Jul 5, 2009
2,780
255
South Dakota
Yet again, the market has exaggerated the short-term negative effects of the events all around. The reason why the market initially took the road down to the basement so fast is because of market's structure, it all works crazy short-term way.
In case of concern there will be excessive panic sales, that will create a strong buying position where fellas with liquidites enter and take close positions.
I actually loaded all in yesterday right before closing time, unloaded half of it this morning and will get rid of the rest right before closing time, have a nice weekend.

Liquidity is essential right after closing time on a friday eve!
 
I don't agree with the above poster's approach. It's a very typical example of novice day-trading thoughts without structure or a regime. There are millions of such traders in the world, essentially losing money on a consistent basis with the occasional casino-style win once in a while. It doesn't work in the long term.
 
Jul 5, 2009
2,780
255
South Dakota
The word "novice-day-trader"...hmm
Let me call it more like sluggish “OldTimers” vs quick thinking “NewSmartGeneration”!

Have you ever visited local “day-traders” gathering down town Jewish quarter in New York , I have done it and I tell you this. –I was fucking scared seeing the way they trading..... I am not even close to them breeds.
"Mainstream new-comers within the economy of today" love using the word “novice-day-trader”, like they are talking about a hypothetical or fictional being from outer space, especially the intelligent one.
I am at my 40’s, have traded violently 15-18 years and consider myself someone to know how NOT losing money.
I cant imagine situation where I live impoverished and austerely while having $400-450K locked in long-term saving/shares and even worse “die rich”, I spend my profit on maintaining my home, boat, my custom choppers etc…. I am not going to embellish my bravados here to seem important. You're absolutely free to draw your conclusions fairly as you please.
As I wrote couple of threads before, my most important definitions/rules experiencing couple of years of trading are;
  • Activate the"Fill or Kill" advance trading.
  • Up 4% down 2% ......sell (extinguish)!
  • Absolute liquidity on a Friday eve.
There are weeks I am absolutely clean and unloaded with full liquidty, waiting!
NEVER ever lost a penny at least and during my last 15 years of trading. I see myself more like William Delbert Gann than today's fearless jewish "day traders".
 
Last edited:
Feb 4, 2005
16,633
1,245
Every person has their own strategy in trading and investments. Personally I am not into index funds as I find them boring and the return is not that great. Buying an index fund is like going to Vegas and doing the 2 columns in Roulette all day long. You will win small or lose small in the long run but you will not satisfy your gambling needs and you will not hit it out of the park either. Maybe it is the way I started buying stocks. The first stock I ever bought (I didn't know the first thing about stocks) was back in around 1990 I was working at a bank and a customer came in and closed two $100,000 CDs with a penalty. I asked him why he was doing that and he said he was buying a stock in a small company in Thousand Oaks that is about to get FDA approval on a drug. That evening I had a couple of thousand and borrowed $5000 from my bro and bought my first stock. A few weeks later on the Nightly Business Report with Paul Kangas (they don't show it anymore) they announced that Amgen's drug was approved and the stock was up 100% or a ridiculous amount. The next morning I sold all except for the profits (kept the free stocks). After that I started studying companies and it wasn't easy back then with no web like now. The next stock was Wild Oats which was a small grocery chain that was selling expensive groceries to YUPPIES. I had been in their stores and couldn't afford their stuff but the rich were buying their shit like there was no tomorrow. They were charging these idiots Five to six times the price of the regular stores like Lucky's and Vons. I bought them and sold them long before Whole Foods came in and bought them. I bought 99 cents store because I went down to the headquarters where people would bring in their shit and some executive would approve or disapprove on the spot for their product to go on the shelf or not. The company was doing great. These 3 first stocks were big winners and reeled me in for the long haul. Over the years I had some losers that even went to JDSU and MCOM (mostly in the dotcom bubble) and recently GE but definitely have done better than holding ETFs. I trade in my retirement funds and invest in regular accounts. You do that and you won't pay capital gains except for the occasional sale in the regular account. At the end of the day it depends on your personality and style in how you invest and trade. There is no right and wrong way.
 
Likes: Bache Tehroon

Hooshmand

National Team Player
Oct 12, 2011
8,562
844
UK
The word "novice-day-trader"...hmm
Let me call it more like sluggish “OldTimers” vs quick thinking “NewSmartGeneration”!

Have you ever visited local “day-traders” gathering down town Jewish quarter in New York , I have done it and I tell you this. –I was fucking scared seeing the way they trading..... I am not even close to them breeds.
"Mainstream new-comers within the economy of today" love using the word “novice-day-trader”, like they are talking about a hypothetical or fictional being from outer space, especially the intelligent one.
I am at my 40’s, have traded violently 15-18 years and consider myself someone to know how NOT losing money.
I cant imagine situation where I live impoverished and austerely while having $400-450K locked in long-term saving/shares and even worse “die rich”, I spend my profit on maintaining my home, boat, my custom choppers etc…. I am not going to embellish my bravados here to seem important. You're absolutely free to draw your conclusions fairly as you please.
As I wrote couple of threads before, my most important definitions/rules experiencing couple of years of trading are;
  • Activate the"Fill or Kill" advance trading.
  • Up 4% down 2% ......sell (extinguish)!
  • Absolute liquidity on a Friday eve.
There are weeks I am absolutely clean and unloaded with full liquidty, waiting!
NEVER ever lost a penny at least and during my last 15 years of trading. I see myself more like William Delbert Gann than today's fearless jewish "day traders".
Good lil emotional essay 😁😂 🤣
 
Likes: Bache Tehroon
Jul 5, 2009
2,780
255
South Dakota
Years back and as a recent graduate I worked for a foreign based company, where they came up with a share-program for all employees.
There were easy rules;
You buy a share, you get one additional for free from the company.
There was a limit on the number of shares you could own within this program, there were two different packages regarding the number of shares you could be assigned to.
You did not need savings of your own of any kind to participate in that program, the company disposed low interest loan from a well-known bank.
Now, you signed to keep these shares in your possession for (3-5 years), at the expiration day you could retain shares of whatever value, the only condition was to repay the loan to the bank in full, interesting part was that you had the right to get rid of the shares (they were registered on your brokerage account and could be unloaded in the free market) whenever you wanted, as far as you repaid the loan immediately to the bank.

I still remember (I quit my job at the company the following year, going over working as a consultant) there were people who kept the shares until the last day, when the value of the assets had crept below the level of the day when the program was signed. Admittedly, the employee did not make any major loss (they stood for the deductible interest they paid to the bank for the loan during 3-5 years, the loan itself being cared of by the company).

Lesson learned;
Quite a lot of employees kept their shares "they sure thought they long-term investing for full house". There were no earning at all doing that.
I sold mine on the market a couple of months later when they were registered, tripled up, repaid the loan to the bank, also paid the profit-tax for selling my shares earlier than agreed, I had $29K clean profit in my hands which I invested, buying 2 new guitars, which are worth more than gold today.